All Of the References

imorawetz:

Basic skin texture tutorial

  1. Create a new layer over the original and eyedrop both a light and dark tone from the base work.  These two colours are what we’ll use as the shadows and highlights of the speckles in the skin.  To paint the texture, we need to use a grainy or dotted brush.
  2. Set the brush Opacity and Flow to 60-80%.  Now we can paint in our dark speckles, paying close attention to creases and folds in skin (build the texture up in these darker areas).  Now do the same with the light colour, with the focus on painting the highlighted parts of the skin rather than dark.
  3. We’ll grab the eraser now, set as a soft round brush with low opacity, and gently erase the ‘harshness’ of the texture away.  We could just turn down the whole layer’s opacity but it won’t look as natural (trust me!). 
    Some areas will need to be generally darker, some lighter, it’ll obviously vary depending on subject.  Also, taking a step back every now and then to observe clarity in the texture can help you determine whether it needs fixing or looks realistic enough.
  4. Now we’ll create another new layer, and again taking the brush (larger in size this time, same opacity/flow) loosely spatter it across the skin in both dark and light.  This adds another dimension of detail. Once again, take the eraser and lightly brush over the layer to tune it down.
  5. To enhance the sharpness and overall level of detail that can be seen, we can bump up the definition by adding this quick textural overlay. I usually leave this part until the very end of the process as it pulls the painting together and is oh so satisfying seeing the level of detail jump up when the gritty texture is added.

amazinglyartisticadvice:

These projects are designed to help break a creative block. I’ve picked them up random places (books, internet, my brain)
  • Take paint chips - tape in sketchbook. Describe mood, smell, taste, texture, & what colour reminds you of.
  • Draw & colour a mandala
  • Paste an image in a sketchbook….

sairobee:

I’m a big fan of film scores, and every year or so I get a bee up my bonnet to share my favorite tracks from my collection. So! Here’s 2012’s list, conveniently categorized according to the mood you might want to evoke. Enjoy!

FUN/JOY

I was wondering if you know of some good place to study animation online
Anonymous

wannabeanimator:

Now, I assume you’re looking for an online college of sorts, and to be honest, I don’t know much about them. Maybe some of my followers could reply with places they recommend. I did find these:

Also there’s a free “animation school” (you won’t get a BFA) run by John K. himself:

But if you’re just looking for some good tutorials, books, etc. to teach yourself animation, the internet is a glorious place. Really you could make your own class schedule (again no BFA) right here online. Here’s your Figure Drawing I:

And Animation I:

Here are some of your teachers:

And the school library:

Of course none of this is really going to replace life drawing or actual classes, but hopefully this gave you some of the answers you were looking for…

carprediem:

abbydoodles:

Head & neck anatomy sheets by juusan13 | gallery (with larger images)


This is gonna be useful…

reverseracism:

postwhitesociety:

pokerwithplato:

subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless
LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”
LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”
LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology
LATISHA: means “happiness”
TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”
ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”
KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”
LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.
MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”
NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”
MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”
NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.
AYANA : Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”
SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”
SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”
TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”
TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”
AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”  Hindu. name meaning “immortal.” African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”
CHICHI f Western African, Igbo Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.
IMANI f & m Eastern African, Swahili, African American Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.
DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.” African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew
BIBI : An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”
ADA : Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.
ZENA : Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”
JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.” Arabic, Muslim, African
KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.” African
RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means “Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”
TAJ means “Crown.” Indian,Sanskrit, African
FATUMA : Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”
NANA : Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”
AJA : High Priestess of Mecca.
ADINA : Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”
BALINDA : A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)
FANTA : Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”
KAYA : Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”
LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”
SHANI : Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”
ANAYA : Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”
TANISHA , TANI : Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”
ZAKIYA : Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”
TITI : Nigerian name meaning “flower.”
SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH : Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”
LULU : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”
KADIJA , KHADIJA : Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”
AMINA : Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.

Correction on Khadijah it’s actually of Arabic/Islamic origin in relation to Mohammed (peace be upon hims) first wife and also meaning born prematurely. It important to note children born prematurely were often seen as special or ‘golden child’ in many cultures. Correction also on Nana which comes from Akan tradition in Ghana it is used to refer to royalty and give a gender neutral indication of King/queen it’s also used in reference elderly members of the family ie grandparents.

o_O so my best friend’s name means “pure and wise” or “lion’s share”
cool

No name is actually ghetto.
To a white person or a POC with a heavy anti-black complexity due to white supremacy, it is not the actual name of the person or the way it is spelled which they consider ghetto, it is the person themselves whole. What makes the name ghetto is not how it sounds or it place of origin, but the black body it is attached to.
Which also Attributes to why white people can name their children “Haley/Haleigh/Hailey/Halley/Hallie” or “Megan/Meagan/Meghan/Meaghan/Maygan”; even the not so ordinary names like ‘Lakelyn’ ‘Ashlyn’ etc etc without batting an eye, because it is attached to a white woman’s body.
It’s why a black child named ‘Asia’ is considered an extreme, but a white child can be named ‘Montana’, the name of a southern state, it’s perfectly normal.
Where as if this woman was BLACK and her name is “Ashleigh”, people would make commentary often about how ‘unique’ the spelling of her name is or how black people are always making up new names of spellings of words.
Love the names your parents gave you. If someone says it’s “ghetto”, I guess you just found out who is racist and who you won’t need or respect later in life.
If you are foreign to a country, DO NOT take a nickname some lazy, ignorant, bigot white person tries to give you. MAKE THEM learn your name, no names are actually that difficult, it’s the mentality that stops a person from learning the correct pronunciation of a name.

reverseracism:

postwhitesociety:

pokerwithplato:

subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless

LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”

LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”

LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology

LATISHA: means “happiness”

TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”

ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”

KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”

LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.

MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”

NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”

MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”

NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.

AYANA : Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”

SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”

SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”

TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”

TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”

AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”
Hindu. name meaning “immortal.”
African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”

CHICHI f Western African, Igbo
Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.

IMANI f & m Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.

AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.

DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.”
African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew

BIBI : An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”

ADA : Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.

ZENA : Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”

JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.”
Arabic, Muslim, African

KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.”
African

RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means
“Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”

TAJ means “Crown.”
Indian,Sanskrit, African

FATUMA : Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”

NANA : Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”

AJA : High Priestess of Mecca.

ADINA : Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”

BALINDA : A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)

FANTA : Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”

KAYA : Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”

LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”

SHANI : Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”

ANAYA : Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”

TANISHA , TANI : Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”

ZAKIYA : Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”

TITI : Nigerian name meaning “flower.”

SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH : Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”

LULU : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”

KADIJA , KHADIJA : Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”

AMINA : Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.

Correction on Khadijah it’s actually of Arabic/Islamic origin in relation to Mohammed (peace be upon hims) first wife and also meaning born prematurely. It important to note children born prematurely were often seen as special or ‘golden child’ in many cultures. Correction also on Nana which comes from Akan tradition in Ghana it is used to refer to royalty and give a gender neutral indication of King/queen it’s also used in reference elderly members of the family ie grandparents.

o_O so my best friend’s name means “pure and wise” or “lion’s share”

cool

No name is actually ghetto.

To a white person or a POC with a heavy anti-black complexity due to white supremacy, it is not the actual name of the person or the way it is spelled which they consider ghetto, it is the person themselves whole. What makes the name ghetto is not how it sounds or it place of origin, but the black body it is attached to.

Which also Attributes to why white people can name their children “Haley/Haleigh/Hailey/Halley/Hallie” or “Megan/Meagan/Meghan/Meaghan/Maygan”; even the not so ordinary names like ‘Lakelyn’ ‘Ashlyn’ etc etc without batting an eye, because it is attached to a white woman’s body.

It’s why a black child named ‘Asia’ is considered an extreme, but a white child can be named ‘Montana’, the name of a southern state, it’s perfectly normal.


Where as if this woman was BLACK and her name is “Ashleigh”, people would make commentary often about how ‘unique’ the spelling of her name is or how black people are always making up new names of spellings of words.

Love the names your parents gave you. If someone says it’s “ghetto”, I guess you just found out who is racist and who you won’t need or respect later in life.

If you are foreign to a country, DO NOT take a nickname some lazy, ignorant, bigot white person tries to give you. MAKE THEM learn your name, no names are actually that difficult, it’s the mentality that stops a person from learning the correct pronunciation of a name.

theartofmtg:

WET PAINT | Art Updates

Here are some of my favorite new art updates from Conspiracy.

It’s always great to see older cards that we might have forgotten about get an artistic face-lift. For me, it’s doubly satisfying when Creative also manages to pay homage to the original artwork, most obviously in the case of Flowstone Blade.

Also, I want a mural of that new Soulcatcher art on my wall, that is gorgeous! If you don’t like bird soldiers, you’re wrong.

nok-ind:

The Yoruba Orisha Part 1 (Part 2)

An Orisha (also spelled Orisa or Orixa) is a spirit or deity that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba religious system. (Olodumare is also known by various other names includ
ing Olorun, Eledumare, Eleda and 

Olofin-Orun). This religion has found its way throughout the world and is now expressed in practices as varied as Candomblé, Lucumí/Santería, Shango in Trinidad, Anago and Oyotunji, as well as in some aspects of Umbanda, Winti, Obeah, Vodun and a host of others.

These varieties or spiritual lineages are practiced throughout areas of Nigeria, the Republic of Benin, Togo, Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela among others. As interest in Yoruba religion system grows, Orisha communities and lineages can be found in parts of Europe and Asia as well. While estimates may vary, some scholars believe that there could be more than 150 million adherents of this spiritual tradition worldwide.

(Please note many Orisha have male/female personifications)

Click here for a Brief understanding. 

Courtesy: James C. Lewis (http://www.noire3000studios.com/)

Do not remove the original comments.